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Why modular construction is the perfect fit for every want and need

Why modular construction is the perfect fit for every want and need

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Modular construction has been growing in popularity among investors and governments in recent years. The reason? Because without it, the ability to create the housing and other buildings that are required, will be greatly diminished and delayed. This week we discuss just why prefabricated building methods can help countries deliver on their construction development needs.

Why modular construction is the answer to many construction-related requirements

Modular construction is an industry that, up until recently, had been gaining support, interest and investment, relatively slowly. Now, however, the outlook for prefabricated, off-site building construction is booming, from every angle that could be considered.

Of course, we’ve discussed previously that while much modernisation and technical development has greatly altered prefabricated construction techniques, the broader idea of modular construction, isn’t a particularly new one. That begs the question, just why has it become so popular?

An additional, perhaps even more pertinent question that many potential investors into the industry might ask, is why is it the right option for India’s specific needs?

The popularisation of modular construction

As the global population climbs, a lack of investment in the construction sector; both from a technical and modernisation perspective and simple delivery basis, mean that right now, in a number of countries, there is a huge shortage of residential housing.

Even in countries and regions where home building has a rich heritage, its proving impossible to construct the amount of homes that are required for the number of residents who need them. Indeed, while existing populations are struggling to find suitable accommodation, current rates of building are set to create a more pronounced future shortage, too.

That’s not to say that traditional home building techniques aren’t fit for purpose. Far from it! New techniques, eco-friendly developments and making the most of a location are all elements of typical, on-site building techniques that are worth the wait.

However, there are also a growing number of situations where inhabitants can’t wait much longer for a suitable home to live in. It’s here where modular, off-site construction has a lot to offer.

Prefabricated construction methods can provide:

  • Cost-effective building.
  • More timely construction timetables, including fewer weather-dependent delays.
  • Better adherence to quality control measures.
  • Delivery of large developments quickly.
  • Easier modification of elements of homes to satisfy specific and changing, local requirements.

The level of skilled construction labour required to construct a modular home, from start to finish, is lower than that of a typical, on-site build. In addition, any delays related to the materials being used for the home, would typically be discovered early on in the process, allowing time for an alternative to be sourced, without bringing the project to a grinding halt.

All of these details, plus many more, work to ensure modular construction is an investment worth making, as returns can only benefit from more timely delivery of the finished product, along with the lower costs associated with the required labour.

India and modular construction

When it comes to modular construction and India’s specific needs, there are additional reasons, to those listed above, that make it a perfect fit. Among them are that it will help drive up construction standards more quickly and in a way that can be easily understood, measured and confirmed.

Given the huge number of homes and other buildings that are required to support, not only the fast-growing urbanisation of the city regions, but also the need for an improved standard of living in rural areas, a construction system that can build trust that building standards are in place and being adhered to, will always be welcome. That’s true, not only for those who will live and work in the properties, but also for:

  • The Government.
  • Modular construction firms.
  • Investors.
  • Construction professionals, of all levels.

Prefabricated construction methods can also make it easier to alter a design and make it more suitable for the very different areas across India. Where small, quick to build homes are required, once a design is created it can be manipulated, as required, reliably and easily.

For those larger homes or buildings, the same is also true. The initial design can be changed as required, with all safety details in place, in accordance to the available land plot and other relevant details.

In addition, let’s not forget the sheer amount of homes and buildings still required across India. No one method is equipped to provide that in a timely manner. Only by utilising all methods, including the modern, modular construction process that’s now available in India and much of the world, can countries hope to home their mainly growing populations.

 

Suchit Punnose, CEO of Red Ribbon said:

Modular construction is an industry that expected to grow by some 75% to around $181 billion by 2026, from its 2018 valuation. To achieve that rate of expansion, it’s clear there’s a real appetite for the industry, on a countrywide Government level and on a business and investment one, too.

The need for housing and commercial buildings that will be safe to use and also suitable for each specific requirement is something that can only be achieved with a combination of modular and traditional construction.

At Red Ribbon we’re proud to support the development of the modular construction sector across India. We know with absolute certainty that our investment in this area will reap benefits for shareholders, India’s Government and population, alike, today and in the years to come.

Eco Hospitality benefits India economy - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

How Eco Hospitality provides a double benefit for India’s economy

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How Eco Hospitality provides a double benefit for India’s economy

The World Bank’s January 2019 Global Prospects Report shows that the United Nations institution continues to expect economic growth across India to expand in 2019 and beyond. The group’s estimate for full-year GDP growth in 2018 is for 7.3%. Meanwhile, the World Bank is also anticipating that level to rise to full-year GDP growth of 7.5% in 2019, 2020 and 2021.

There are many details that go into a forecast like this, which means it is an absolutely achievable and likely outcome. However, if some of the assumptions made in those forecasts don’t proceed as expected. Or, something completely unexpected occurs, then India’s economy could either exceed or fail to achieve that forecast rate of growth.

Another interesting figure that has recently been published about India’s economy, comes from the Indian Government’s Ministry of Statistics. According to its 2018 Environmental statistics, the natural capital in 11 of India’s states has declined. Natural Capital “refers to all types of environmental assets existing in the environment” according to the report.

Once again, a lot of work and details go into creating these data and stats to produce reliable and correct information.
The figures in that painstakingly generated report suggest that, at least in some parts of India, pure economic growth is being achieved at the expense of the country’s natural capital, or native environment. And that’s not something that can be allowed to continue unchecked. At least not if the economy is to remain on a long-term and sustainable, positive economic growth path.

 

Sustainable, eco-industry

With that in mind, we now turn to a specific part of India’s growing economy, the Eco, or green sector. While much thought is being put into how to ensure residential building and consumer habits are increasingly sustainable and Eco-friendly, another key area in which India is already developing an Eco-footprint in, is hospitality.

For a country that welcomed over 10 million overseas tourists during 2017 – an increase of 14% in number and 15.4% in income generation – it’s a sizable industry. In GDP terms, the total contribution from travel and tourism across India made up 9.4% of India’s GDP in 2017, likely rising to around 17% in 2018, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council.

If, however, efforts into supporting and growing the eco-hospitality sector of the travel and tourism industry continue, or even gain pace, not only will green hotels, eco holiday destinations and sustainable tourist hot spots generate welcome income for the economy, it will also help improve and even expand the country’s natural capital. That’s something that’s a double boon for the sub-continent that consistently strives to develop, advance and improve.

Eco Hotels is among the green businesses that are investing in India’s economy, in a sustainable way. The world’s first carbon neutral, mid-market hotel brand has been operating since 2012 and is a popular option, for businesses, investors and also among those travellers who include Eco credentials in their search for holiday accommodation.

Growing India’s eco-hospitality sector is something that is will undoubtedly help ensure the country’s travel and tourism industry will contribute to both the financial GDP figures and its nature capital. But, even better, positive eco changes in one country actually contribute to green credentials and work towards stopping climate change on a global basis too.

With so many benefits to be gained from Eco hospitality, there’s little doubt as to just how valuable it is to India’s economic, business and green ambitions.

Red Ribbon is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral hotel brand which offers “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India designed to take advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand meets all key sustainability criteria without compromising on either quality or standards of hospitality and is designed to cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Understanding the full implications of the way in which a country achieves economic expansion is an essential part of working towards maximising that country’s growth potential, while also making sure all the ingredients required to continue growing and innovating remain available. While the 11 states experiencing a decline in their nature capital account for fewer than half of India’s regions, its not something that should be ignored.

With Eco Hotels, Red Ribbon is putting both India’s economy and nature capital at the heart of its investment strategy. Combatting climate change, promoting sustainable industry and creating profitable carbon neutral businesses, is the right way to create an investment that will remain popular and relevant for years to come.

India Economic Evolution - Republic Day - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

India’s economic fortunes in the 70 years since gaining independence

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India’s economic fortunes in the 70 years since gaining independence

This year’s Republic Day in India marks the 70th anniversary since it truly became an independent country, with its first elected President after the withdrawal of British rule in 1947. Since then, every year on January 26th, the nation celebrates its hard-won achievement.

India’s first elected President was Dr. Rajendra Prasad, who took his oath at the Durbar Hall in Government House. Since that time, India has proudly voted for its own President during elections and celebrates that independence with joy and jubilation.

Of course, the year is now 2019 and many things have changed since 1950. Ram Nath Kovind is the country’s 14th President, with Narendra Modi serving as Prime Minister. The economic landscape is very different from 70 years ago and it continues to transform further as a combination of financial, digital and ecological developments demand.

Economic output

It’s never easy to gain a true comparison of economic performance between years gone by and any given year in today’s era. However, the available data does give an idea of the make up of economic growth and also the rate at which a country expands – or contracts.

Given India’s size, population, agricultural performance and the more recent growth of eCommerce and finance, you likely won’t be surprised to find that the current pace of GDP growth is superior compared to the rates of growth achieved in 1950.

Data from India’s Central Statistics Office shows that GDP growth in the 1951-52 financial year was 2.3%, with the main contributor to that growth, being the agricultural sector.

Until recently, academics have placed India’s average rate of GDP growth at somewhere between the 3.5% to 4.5% level. But that average is well below the 7.5% rate of GDP growth anticipated for 2018 and also that masks many peaks and changes in the country’s fortunes and chosen paths.

The official data show that after some notable peaks and troughs, GDP has been broadly positive and even prosperous since the 1980s. India’s economic landscape, however, has shown a consistent picture of agriculture losing its place as the major part of the economy, being replaced by the services sector.

Where agriculture made up over half of activity and profits in the 1950s, it now accounts for around 18% of GDP growth, despite employing close to 50% of its population. The services sector, meanwhile, has doubled from a proportion of around 30% of GDP in the 1950’s to the 60% mark, today.

This switch between the dominance of two key industries across India highlights the way technology and digitisation have evolved and been embraced across the country and indeed, the world. While some pain has been felt along the way during that transformation, it also shows that even though it is a huge country with an impressive population, it is able to recognise when change is required and crucially, to implement that change.

Modern economic drivers

Republic Day is a wonderful to day to remember that after 20 years of struggling to gain independence, it was finally achieved. It is also a day to reflect on how, as an independent country, India has chosen to adapt to and even welcome wide-reaching changes, today.

Technology and digitization is something that has affected every industry and by embracing that, the future for India’s economy has become brighter.

Manufacturing has changed thanks to the way technology has enhanced its capabilities and made it a safer environment for its workers. Meanwhile, tourism and eco-hospitality are also examples of where the abilities of technology, combined with the wants of a modern society, can be incorporated to produce something that not only services the needs of consumers, but also the needs of the environment in the name of sustainability.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Republic Day is a special day, not only because of the celebrations that mark its passing, but also because it underscores that as a country, India is always moving forward, developing and achieving thanks to its own population and ability to embrace change.

Red Ribbon embodies that sentiment and our investment in industries such as modular construction, through Modulex and the eco-hospitality sector, with Eco-Hotels, show that we’re always looking towards supporting a prosperous future for India’s economy and vast population.

We look forward to continuing to play our part in India’s future, participating to the utmost in the opportunities the subcontinent’s explosive growth has to offer and at the same time providing above market rate returns from our investors in what I am convinced will continue to be one of the world’s most exciting markets for many years to come.

Eco Tourism Odisha - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

How Eco-Tourism is generating economic boost for India

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How Eco-Tourism is generating economic boost for India’s Odisha state

Eco-tourism is becoming an increasingly important part of India’s economic growth. Just take a look at the state of Odisha. Located on the on the Eastern coast of India, on the Bay of Bengal, Odisha’s investment into eco-tourism is beginning to pay off, as it’s expected to generate some Rs6 Crore (£ 700,000) in revenue by the end of the 2018-19 financial year and providing a boost to local Government coffers.

As the popularity of the sector continues to grow, so too will the India Government’s return on its investment.

Of course, this economic benefit hasn’t happened overnight. However, nor has it taken as long as one might anticipate. The Odisha State Government has invested some Rs34 crore (£ 4 million) during the 2016-17 to 2018-19 financial years, into 37 separate eco-tourism locations across the state.

The eco-tourism offerings, created and managed by Odisha’s Forest and Environment Department are expected to reach Rs 10 crore (£ 1 Million) in the 2019-20 financial year, according to the department’s chief conservator of Forests and wildlife.

As you can see, even though the end of the current fiscal period has not yet arrived, the region is already seeing notable revenue generation form its investments, with further growth anticipated. That highlights the popularity of eco-tourism and hospitality as a something that’s more than a passing trend.

For the Indian sub-continent, which is awash with natural beauty and a growing desire to enhance that, with green, eco-friendly and carbon neutral hotels and other hospitality sector developments, now is the perfect time to support that ambition. Not only does it give tourists – from both India and the rest of the world – the opportunity to retain their eco-consciousness even when they travel far afield. But it also provides an option for investors to make socially responsible and sustainable financial decisions, too.

That’s essentially why opting for sustainable and eco-friendly investments is a good decision right now; they provide an option for travellers, countries and investors, who hold to environmental ideals that are now possible.

But Odisha isn’t the only region in India to pursue eco-friendly tourism. There are a growing number of mid-market eco-hotels that are continuing to expand across India. We’ve previously highlighted how Lemon Tree hotels is already proving a success in terms of cost controls and room occupancy rates.

Our own carbon neutral hotel group Eco Hotels, meanwhile, builds on everything we’ve mentioned here – and more. Demand for hotels across India is strong and rising, boosted in part, by the increasing middle-classes of the region.

Creating an eco-friendly hotel chain fulfills all the needs that we have identified:

  • The growing number of hotels across the subcontinent.
  • Creating sustainable, carbon neutral tourism options.
  • Giving investors peace of mind that their decision to support Eco Hotels, is a socially and environmentally responsible one, as well as a sound financial one.

Red Ribbon is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral hotel brand which offers “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India designed to take advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand meets all key sustainability criteria without compromising on either quality or standards of hospitality and is designed to cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

The quick and impressive revenue generation from the commitment of an entire Indian state to eco-friendly tourism, only works to highlight our belief that socially and environmentally responsible developments and investment decisions, are the right path for, not only Red Ribbon, but the broader investment community.

Eco hotels, that are created to provide business and leisure travellers with the accommodation they desire, in the location of their choice, is just one way we are supporting this view. With demand for such options growing both domestically and internationally, the Eco Hotels brand is proud to be built with carbon neutrality and green credentials as part of its fundamental core.

I’m proud that Eco Hotels have done just that from the very beginning of the project, and proud too of the part Red Ribbon has played in developing the brand and its ambitions in the succeeding years, spearheading an environmentally friendly response to India’ resurgent tourism demands.

The Eco Hotel Phenomenon and Donald Trump’s observations- Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

The Eco Hotel Phenomenon and Donald Trump’s observations

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What turns a run of the mill, resource hungry hotel into an Eco Hotel and why does it matter? Well, the clue lies partly in the question: an Eco Hotel isn’t resource hungry at all. Instead of gobbling away at all before it, an Eco Hotel sips and nibbles at its key resources: energy, water and raw materials. Eco Hotels are hard wired to save water and minimise on energy and waste material usage. But what about the second part of the question: why does any of this matter? Look no further than last week’s US National Climate Change Assessment, the work of 300 scientists and 13 Federal Agencies which concluded that “ Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilisation, primarily as a result of human activities…” Donald Trump may have dismissed the three-inch thick report out of hand as “largely based on the most extreme scenario”, but virtually nobody else is.

And for a President so intent on wrapping himself in a mantle of economic competence (and hotel owner to boot), the supreme irony is that key policies at the heart of a concerted response to adverse climate change are now proving to be drivers of commercial growth too. Eco Hotels are a case in point.

By definition, a non resource hungry hotel will also have reduced operating costs: it’s also likely to have reduced liabilities, will generally produce a higher return on relatively low risk investments and also deliver greater profitability across the board than its more resource hungry counterparts. Those are the hard conclusions arrived at in the seminal sector report for the subcontinent “Green Hotels and Sustainable Hotel Operations in India” and, perhaps inevitably, the markets haven’t been slow to see their potential either. Green hotels are more popular than ever on the subcontinent and if you need solid evidence of that, look no further than the explosive growth of Lemon Tree Hotels after the company’s successful IPO earlier this year.

Donald Trump could usefully brush up on his bedtime reading before leaving the West Wing to resume control of his own hotel chain …

The travelling public (business and leisure) is now increasingly aware of the importance of environmental compliance when it comes to choosing a hotel room, and the current surge in demand on the subcontinent is running well ahead of supply: not least because India’s tourist numbers have reached unprecedented levels in absolute terms as well.

But when it comes to meeting this burgeoning demand in practice, something much more is required than simply re-branding an existing hotel with “green credentials”. Key consumption variables have to be built in from the very beginning of the construction phase: making water saving devices and waste reduction part of the DNA of the hotel from the outset of the project. That’s why Eco Hotels are being built with solar tubing that reflects light across the hotel day and night, resulting in electricity bills that are roughly half those of a conventional hotel and its properties also has a single kitchen which dramatically reduces the carbon footprint. All those savings go straight to the bottom line.

Red Ribbon is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral hotel brand which offers “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India designed to take advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand meets all key sustainability criteria without compromising on either quality or standards of hospitality and is designed to cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

The boom in Indian tourism (both domestically and internationally) is currently playing a huge part in driving forward the subcontinent’s resurgent hotel and hospitality sector, and as the article says eco credentials are playing a bigger part than ever in determining where this burgeoning tide of travellers are deciding to stay. Recent surveys confirm so called “green credentials” are high up on the scale of priorities when they come to make their choice.

And as the article also says, meeting that demand is certainly not just a matter of a last minute rebranding. To deliver properly on green credentials, the hotel has to be built with eco compliance as part of its structure (from the ground up). Only by doing this will cost savings and sustainability criteria properly come together in the future operation of the hotel, delivering the range of benefits described in the article.

I’m proud that Eco Hotels have done just that from the very beginning of the project, and proud too of the part Red Ribbon has played in developing the brand and its ambitions in the succeeding years, spearheading an environmentally friendly response to India’ resurgent tourism demands.

India Mid Market Hotels - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

How and why mid-market hotels are taking over India’s branded sector

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In the late 1980’s Esso commissioned a survey of its UK customers and found less than 7% travelled onto Mainland Europe with their cars. Why this reticence on the part of families clearly capable of making their way from Poole to Provence in an overcrowded Metro? And no, it’s not what you think: back in those days we hadn’t even thought of Brexit. As Esso found out, there was a more homely explanation: the Continent simply had far fewer automated pumps on its forecourts, so drivers were in danger of having to talk with an attendant and you know how the English are with languages. Better leave the car behind than risk the unseemly spectacle of sign language on the forecourt with a Frenchman.

And when you think about it, that’s all quite interesting. It’s the reason petrol stations have gradually come to look exactly the same all over the world: with the pumps all roughly in the same place, all self service and roughly the same kind of shop to pay in. It’s why you can now buy a burger (from a screen) in identical McDonalds outlets from Vienna to Vladivostok without once having to speak a word of German or Russian, and it’s why Esso long made sure you can buy your petrol the same way. There’s simply no need to leave the car at home anymore…so we don’t. We buy more petrol instead and everyone’s happy.

Economists call this phenomenon Brand Synergy and until recently India’s mid-market Hotel Sector was widely perceived to be more or less dead to its charms. A senior analyst on the subcontinent memorably (and anonymously) put it as follows: “…it was like an airline that uses a Boeing 747 for travel between Delhi and Mumbai, a Dakota for Kolkata-Delhi, and a Dornier for Bengaluru-Pune”. The poor old travellers never knew what to expect when they got there. Just like trying to buy petrol by word of mouth.

But not anymore…

The subcontinent’s mid-market Hotels including Ibis Styles, Lemon Tree Hotels and Eco Hotels have all made progress over the last decade in adopting a much more uniform approach to product profiling, achieving a consistency in specification that has now seen the mid-market secure nearly half the branded hotel sector: spurred on, no doubt, by an increasing number of private equity investors, none of whom are noted for being slow in recognising brand synergies when they see them.

All of which has made the mid-market uniquely well placed to take advantage of the surge in India’s middle class and increasingly urbanised travellers that has doubled airline occupancy rates over the last seven years.  And with the average cost of building a mid-market room coming in at between Rs 3 Million and Rs 7 Million, breaking even within six years, it all makes bottom line economic sense too. Compare that with the larger branded chains where average construction cost for each room is Rs 15 Million and break even takes 15 years: more than twice as long.  In the past 10 years alone the mid-market has expanded at more than 15% annually (according to Howarth HTL) and now accounts for 43% of total branded stock.

Having got away its successful IPO earlier this year (raising Rs 311 Crore from key investors), Lemon Tree Hotels last week took the trend a stage further by launching its brand overseas: signing a deal for the first of its hotels to open in Dubai next year. It will be the first mid-market hotel on the luxury studded Al Wasi Road, sitting literally in the shadow of the Burj Al Arab and Al Waleed Real Estate’s CEO didn’t miss the significance:  “There was a need for a mid-market hotel of this calibre in this location and India has been the largest source of tourists into Dubai, as well as the UAE as a whole, for over three years now.” To save you Googling it up, the exact figure is 13%: India now accounts for a whopping 13% of total tourist numbers into the Emirates, which shouldn’t come as a surprise to anybody given the subcontinent’s wealth and proximity as well as the population’s found mobility.

And now they’ll recognise at least one familiar, distinctively Indian hotel brand when they get there…Plus ca change.

Red Ribbon Asset Management is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral mid-market hotel brand, offering “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India which intended to take full advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand offers sustainable living without compromising on standards of hospitality and is designed to cater to commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Working as part of the Eco Hotels Project has certainly taught me the importance of branding and product profiling in the hospitality sector, so I was pleased to read about the renewed emphasis on branding generally and unsurprised to see that it has now increased the mid-market share to just shy of 50%. Monolithic 2000 room hotel chains are no longer the first choice for travellers, especially given all the evidence suggests they are increasingly looking for accommodation that also complements their preference for sustainability.

And that’s important because the boom in Indian tourism (domestically and internationally) is playing a significant part in driving forward the subcontinent’s resurgent hotel and hospitality sector. It’s certainly an area that cannot be overlooked when seeking out the best investment opportunities over the coming years.

That’s why I’m very proud that Red Ribbon has played such a significant role in the creation and development of the Eco Hotels Project, spearheading the response to that demand in an environmentally friendly manner.

Hospitality with Responsibility - The Explosive Growth of India’s Mid Market - Eco Hotels

Hospitality with Responsibility: The Explosive Growth of India’s Mid Market

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Jawaharlal Nehru famously championed “hospitality with responsibility” and riding high as it is on the crest of an unprecedented surge in tourism, India is holding hard to the father of the nation’s message. Not least because public awareness of environmental imperatives has never been higher on the subcontinent, leading Prime Minister Modi’s Government to respond (characteristically) with a programme of market driven “green hospitality” initiatives that embrace everything from streamlined Visa procedures through to water sustainability programmes and everything in between. The result is a striking pattern of explosive growth in India’s important mid market sector where the bulk of those initiatives are currently taking root.

And it’s not all about the environment either, with most analysts also pointing to the importance green hospitality is having on financial performance as well, and not just on the bottom line either where reduced energy costs and leaner waste targets have an obvious potential to cut operating costs. Environmentally friendly policies also have an almost unique potential to attract the new generation of business and social travellers who are placing sustainability at the top of their checklists, with even the hardest nosed business travellers supporting the trend: Deloitte’s, scion of the pinstriped traveller, has published polling results taken from 1,000 businessmen and women, no less than 95% of whom wanted more green initiatives with 38% admitting to checking whether their chosen hotel was sufficiently green before deciding to book.

Put it another way, in less desiccated language not favoured by Deloitte, Eco Hospitality has now become an essential part of Mid Market’s success story on the subcontinent… and there’s no sign of it losing any of that importance any time soon.

Just look at Lemon Tree Hotels and Eco Hotels both of which are blazing a trail in making the most of the opportunities India’s mid market hospitality sector has to offer, each of them pursuing ambitious expansion programmes and delivering above market rate returns for investors.

Red Ribbon Asset Management is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral mid market hotel brand, which has “green hospitality” built into its genetic structure. The company has embarked on an ambitious programme to roll out a chain of new facilities across the subcontinent, designed to take full advantage of market opportunities currently available in India’s mid market segment. The brand offers sustainable living without compromising on quality and will cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

India has become something of a crucible to test out trends in the hospitality sector. As most of us will have observed over recent years “green tourism” and “green hospitality” have become increasingly dominant in determining the choice of hotel for business and recreational travellers alike: part of a global environmental trend that seems, ironically, to have picked up pace even more following Donald Trump’s withdrawal of the United States from the Paris Climate accords.

But what makes India different from other bellwether economies worldwide is the sheer pace of the change that is currently taking place on the subcontinent. Number of travellers choosing to travel to and across India has reached an all time high, carriers are reporting exceptional volumes and occupancy rates and the mid sector is picking up a larger percentage of these travellers than ever before. I’m sure that will all in lead to an acceleration of the rate at which the trend for “green tourism” evolves in India as opposed to other markets across the world, meaning we can expect to see green tourism’s importance on the subcontinent before anywhere else.

As the article also points out, Eco Hospitality is an essential part of this trend so I’m very much looking forward to seeing how things develop, especially with Red Ribbon’s Eco Hotel project playing such an important part in the market.

Hospitality in India - Eco Hotels - Red Ribbon Asset Management

Mid Market’s Moment: Trends in India’s Hospitality Sector

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India seems to do everything on a bigger scale these days: the fastest growing large economy on the planet and the highest rate of GDP growth anywhere in the world (currently a shade over 8%). So why settle for just one reason when you can have five? Why settle for one reason to explain the explosive growth in India’s hospitality sector over the past decade, something to tell us whether current growth rates in the sector are sustainable? And in case you’re wondering, the answer to the second part of that question is “yes”, but we’ll come back to that in a moment.

First though the reasons for the sector’s extraordinary growth, and as promised there are five of them: a surge in middle class numbers as India’s population becomes steadily larger and more affluent (in other words, much more consumer led demand); an overall increase in absolute business and leisure travel numbers; rapid urbanisation of the population (meaning that you need more and bigger hotels in densely populated areas); progressive economic growth (the subcontinent’s rising population has more money to spend) and lastly (fifthly, as I’m sure you’re still counting), a doubling in domestic air travel numbers over the last seven years. All these factors have now come together in a perfect storm to booster mid-market hotel brands in India, and that means in particular mid-size business hotels and eco friendly hotels.

In 2002 less than 25% of India’s hotel stock was mid-market in that sense, but this year the equivalent figure was 43% (according to the global advisory firm Horwath HTL). Between 2002 and March 2017 the supply of chain affiliated hotel rooms grew at 11% annually, but this too was outstripped by the mid-market segment, which grew over the same period at an impressive 15%. On any basis that is a striking shift in the market demographic over such a relatively short period, and if it tells us only one thing it is that now is perfect the time for investing in mid market hotel developments on the subcontinent.

And not just because statistics favour the segment so strongly, because development makes more financial sense in absolute terms too.

The average cost of building a mid market hotel room in India is between Rs 3 Million and Rs 7 Million, compared with a major chain development where the equivalent figure is Rs 15 Million which means that a mid market unit will break even faster: within six years rather than twelve for a chain development. The variables are in favour of the mid market too, because these break even projections are based on historic demand and, as we have seen, there has been a recent surge across the sector with current occupancy rates running at higher than 65%. The average room rates have also grown by more than 8% in the last decade, so we can realistically expect break even times to start coming down.

Red Ribbon Asset Management is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral mid market hotel brand, offering “green hospitality” as part of its current roll out programme which is structured to take full advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand offers sustainable living without compromising on standards of hospitality and is designed to cater to commercial and recreational travellers alike.

And the timing couldn’t be better with everything pointing to a mid market surge.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Red Ribbon is the founding force behind Eco Hotels, and continues to support the project’s current roll out across the subcontinent where we are very confident that it will play a key part in the all important mid market sector. Not least because we know that a combination of demographic factors (driven primarily by India’s burgeoning and increasingly urbanised population) as well as the current acute shortage of hotel stock, combine to make the subcontinent’s hotel sector such an extremely attractive sector for investment.

To illustrate that point graphically, it is worth remembering that there are currently more hotel units on the island of Manhattan alone than there are in the entire expanse of the subcontinent. And that supply deficit is bound to create fertile ground for new investment, not least because of the five factors highlighted in the article.

At Red Ribbon we pride ourselves on our in depth knowledge of Indian markets, and the hotel and hospitality sector in particular. With more than a hundred advisers working daily on the ground in the market’s hot spots, we are confident that we can identify the best investment opportunities as they arise, taking full advantage of the trends for growth in this, the most exciting growth market on the world.

“A Goldmine of Opportunity Waiting to be Tapped”: Eco Tourism in India

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The Indian Government publishes an annual Economic Survey on trends and market conditions on the subcontinent and the Finance Minister last month tabled the latest of these before Parliament. For the first time, it is the second such report to be published within a year, perhaps reflecting the current dizzying pace of economic change across India, the fastest growing large economy in the world. And the second part of the 2017 Survey has some interesting things to say about the future of Indian Tourism, and Indian Eco Tourism in particular.

The Survey reports that Tourism and Hospitality together account for a healthy 9% of GDP in India, generating $117.7 billion last year and expected to climb to $418.9 billion by 2022. Foreign exchange earnings derived from tourism in 2016 amounted to $22.9 billion (8.8% more than the equivalent 2015 figure). Tourism and Hospitality is, in the words of the Economic Survey: “…a goldmine of opportunity waiting to be tappedIndia continues to charm international tourists with its vast cultural and natural resources.”

The Government has certainly not been slow to encourage tourist growth with a series of innovative policies such as the e-Visa programme (which now covers 161 countries): the system is a marked improvement on the old and notoriously inefficient paper-based process, with a total of no less than 1,079,696 e-Visa holders visiting India during 2016: 142.5% of the 2015 figure. But look back at those numbers from the Economic Survey again: overseas earnings, to which initiatives like the e-Visa system are directed, account for less than a quarter of the overall revenue in the sector. The rest is made up of business and domestic travel. What is the Government doing to promote that part of the goldmine?

That’s where Eco Tourism comes in.

According to this year’s Green Lodging Trends Report domestic and business travellers are more and more choosing their hotel accommodation by reference to its green credentials, and the report comes to three particularly striking findings on the basis of an extensive survey of leading hotels:

  • Offsetting carbon consumption to achieve emission reductions is an increasingly important factor with hotel guests as well as with businesses (likely to be paying for their stay): “the topic is hitting home more than ever”;
  • The majority of travellers (business and recreational) actively prefer eco-friendly destinations and are prepared to pay more to get them;
  • When asked: “to what degree does climate change drive you to make operational improvements and investments”, 84% of hoteliers responded that it did and 40% said that it had a “significant impact”, an increase of 12% from last year (in itself an expression of the practical, operational impact of the first two (consumer driven) points made above.

Eco Hotels is the world’s first carbon-neutral hotel brand, supporting sustainable living without compromising on standards of hospitality; and it is a model for sustainable hospitality projects on the subcontinent. Red Ribbon Asset Management is the founding investor in EcoLodge, a key Eco Hotels brand. Having started in 2012 from its flagship Hotel in Cochin, Eco Lodge is now well on the way to rolling out its target of 10,000 eco friendly rooms in India by 2020; and given the trends signaled in this month’s Economic Survey, the brand seems certain to remain at the vanguard of this paradigm shift in the sector.

Read the latest Indian Economic Survey here: indiabudget.nic.in/survey.asp

Read the Green Lodging Trends Report here: www.greenlodgingnews.com/green-lodging-survey/

Read about EcoHotels and EcoLodge here: www.theeco.com/about_us.php

India’s Hospitality Sector: Journey to Success

By | India, News | No Comments

India’s new Goods and Services Tax (GST) was introduced this month (launched at the chimes of midnight on the 1st of July): this new fiscal regime will inevitably improve trading across the sub continent’s burgeoning internal markets. The hospitality sector can expect to benefit in particular which will be further welcome news given the influential Indian Credit Ratings Agency (ICRA) has recently published its annual forecast projecting a marked growth in hotel occupancy revenues of 8% over the coming year; all of which goes a long way to vindicate the strategic importance Red Ribbon has already given its Eco Hotels project as part of the company’s dynamic investment programme.

Red Ribbon first invested in Eco Hotels in 2012 and the Project has characteristically delivered both on bottom line profits for investors and for the environment: one of the first of the Eco Hotel’s (built in Kochi), for example, has solar tubing that reflects light across the building so as to reduce energy overheads. It’s a good example of how Red Ribbon’s Mainstream Impact Investment strategies work in practice; building a sustainable, long-term business that works long term as part of its community and the wider society because it is resilient and profitable.

But it is also encouraging to hear that Prime Minister Modi’s Government has been thinking laterally about India’s hospitality sector as well. Not everybody coming to India from overseas will arrive by air; many will – literally – come from over the seas.

The Ministries of Shipping and Tourism announced last month that they will in future be working together on an Action Plan to promote India as a Cruise Tourism destination and at the same time developing an ecosystem model for the growth of cruise tourism in India. As the first step in the process, a Governmental workshop was also organised last month by the Ministry of Shipping in Delhi so as to discuss an ‘Action Plan for Development of Cruise Tourism in India’.

Speaking at the opening of the workshop, Nitin Gadkari, Union Minister for Shipping, Road Transport and Highways said that Cruise Tourism is one of the fastest growing components of the leisure industry worldwide and can become a major growth driver for the Indian economy through generating new employment opportunities in the sector; and it is difficult to disagree with him because India has the potential to cater for at least seven hundred cruise ships each year; compare that with the one hundred and fifty eight this year so far; and the cruise industry can generate more than 2.5 lakh jobs for ten lakh cruise passengers providing an additional boost to the economy at large.

Cruise terminals are already being developed at five major ports: Mumbai, Goa, Cochin, Mangalore and Chennai; added to which inland waterways will also be developed over the coming years to add to the available infrastructure network: ten inland waterways will be added on the subcontinent by the end of this year alone.

Read about Eco Hotels here: (www.theeco.com/about_us.php).

Read about Red Ribbon Asset Management here: (www.redribbon.co/)

Read about the Indian Government’s Plan to Promote Cruise Tourism here: (www.livemint.com › Politics › Policy)

 

Red Ribbon

At Red Ribbon we understand that the transition towards a resilient global economy will be led by well-governed businesses in mainstream markets, striving to reduce the environmental impact of their production processes on society at large and on the environment as well.

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