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Why modular construction is the perfect fit for every want and need

Why modular construction is the perfect fit for every want and need

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Modular construction has been growing in popularity among investors and governments in recent years. The reason? Because without it, the ability to create the housing and other buildings that are required, will be greatly diminished and delayed. This week we discuss just why prefabricated building methods can help countries deliver on their construction development needs.

Why modular construction is the answer to many construction-related requirements

Modular construction is an industry that, up until recently, had been gaining support, interest and investment, relatively slowly. Now, however, the outlook for prefabricated, off-site building construction is booming, from every angle that could be considered.

Of course, we’ve discussed previously that while much modernisation and technical development has greatly altered prefabricated construction techniques, the broader idea of modular construction, isn’t a particularly new one. That begs the question, just why has it become so popular?

An additional, perhaps even more pertinent question that many potential investors into the industry might ask, is why is it the right option for India’s specific needs?

The popularisation of modular construction

As the global population climbs, a lack of investment in the construction sector; both from a technical and modernisation perspective and simple delivery basis, mean that right now, in a number of countries, there is a huge shortage of residential housing.

Even in countries and regions where home building has a rich heritage, its proving impossible to construct the amount of homes that are required for the number of residents who need them. Indeed, while existing populations are struggling to find suitable accommodation, current rates of building are set to create a more pronounced future shortage, too.

That’s not to say that traditional home building techniques aren’t fit for purpose. Far from it! New techniques, eco-friendly developments and making the most of a location are all elements of typical, on-site building techniques that are worth the wait.

However, there are also a growing number of situations where inhabitants can’t wait much longer for a suitable home to live in. It’s here where modular, off-site construction has a lot to offer.

Prefabricated construction methods can provide:

  • Cost-effective building.
  • More timely construction timetables, including fewer weather-dependent delays.
  • Better adherence to quality control measures.
  • Delivery of large developments quickly.
  • Easier modification of elements of homes to satisfy specific and changing, local requirements.

The level of skilled construction labour required to construct a modular home, from start to finish, is lower than that of a typical, on-site build. In addition, any delays related to the materials being used for the home, would typically be discovered early on in the process, allowing time for an alternative to be sourced, without bringing the project to a grinding halt.

All of these details, plus many more, work to ensure modular construction is an investment worth making, as returns can only benefit from more timely delivery of the finished product, along with the lower costs associated with the required labour.

India and modular construction

When it comes to modular construction and India’s specific needs, there are additional reasons, to those listed above, that make it a perfect fit. Among them are that it will help drive up construction standards more quickly and in a way that can be easily understood, measured and confirmed.

Given the huge number of homes and other buildings that are required to support, not only the fast-growing urbanisation of the city regions, but also the need for an improved standard of living in rural areas, a construction system that can build trust that building standards are in place and being adhered to, will always be welcome. That’s true, not only for those who will live and work in the properties, but also for:

  • The Government.
  • Modular construction firms.
  • Investors.
  • Construction professionals, of all levels.

Prefabricated construction methods can also make it easier to alter a design and make it more suitable for the very different areas across India. Where small, quick to build homes are required, once a design is created it can be manipulated, as required, reliably and easily.

For those larger homes or buildings, the same is also true. The initial design can be changed as required, with all safety details in place, in accordance to the available land plot and other relevant details.

In addition, let’s not forget the sheer amount of homes and buildings still required across India. No one method is equipped to provide that in a timely manner. Only by utilising all methods, including the modern, modular construction process that’s now available in India and much of the world, can countries hope to home their mainly growing populations.

 

Suchit Punnose, CEO of Red Ribbon said:

Modular construction is an industry that expected to grow by some 75% to around $181 billion by 2026, from its 2018 valuation. To achieve that rate of expansion, it’s clear there’s a real appetite for the industry, on a countrywide Government level and on a business and investment one, too.

The need for housing and commercial buildings that will be safe to use and also suitable for each specific requirement is something that can only be achieved with a combination of modular and traditional construction.

At Red Ribbon we’re proud to support the development of the modular construction sector across India. We know with absolute certainty that our investment in this area will reap benefits for shareholders, India’s Government and population, alike, today and in the years to come.

Modular Construction

Saving Time, Money and the Environment through Modular Construction

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Saving Time, Money and the Environment through Modular Construction

Modular construction methods are often hailed as a more cost-effective option, but that’s far from the only benefit pre-fabricated buildings can have. We take you through how modular construction firms can save on time, the environment and money, while also delivering a return on investment many would be happy to receive.

It’s no secret that global real-estate related costs are rising. The value of property is broadly on the up. Meanwhile, the cost of materials is also climbing, while skilled construction professionals are becoming more scarce, pushing their value up, too. But there is a solution to this problem: modular construction.

Just like many other countries, across India, many people still have a dream of owning their own home. However, with more people moving into urban areas of the country from the rural regions, that’s not always an easy achievement, even for those with stable, well-paid jobs. Indeed, research suggests some 110 million additional housing units will be required by 2022. That’s a tall order and once that is simply unachievable through traditional construction methods alone.

However, major advances in modular construction techniques mean homes can be built quickly, in an environmentally friendly way, while also proving a more cost-effective option.

Saving you time and money

Much scepticism remains over how reliable and practical modular construction techniques are. Although, there are signs the opinion of the sector is improving as more businesses opt for it over traditional building methods.

One major factor that’s encouraging more businesses and home-buyers to choose a modular property is time. Once you gain permission, finalise plans and pay deposits, the fabrication of a modular building is much quicker than one constructed on site, in a more traditional manner.

That’s because templates and machinery in an established and regulated factory can create the specified shell of your building quickly and to approved safety standards.

Once those elements of the building, be it a home, a commercial office or even a hotel, are created, it’s then checked and verified through a reliable, tech-based system. This ensures all the required parts are there, of the right size and structure and are ready to be transported to the previously prepared building site.

This is where the costs savings come into play. Where a traditionally built property can require up to hundreds of on-site construction professionals to build up walls, ensure measurements are perfect and all the materials are as they should be, a pre-fabricated construction team is typically much smaller. That smaller team will also need much less time on site to construct the unit and ensure its safely in situ as planned, ready for the next step.

Again, with so much of the required works already done, the modular building requires only a little additional work on site, before the owner can get to work on the inside and make it habitable.

This means that while the cost of the materials used to construct a modular building aren’t particularly cheaper than for any other property, costs are saved through the shorter period of time skilled construction professionals are required on site. Meanwhile, the requirement of fewer construction professionals is also a financial benefit.

Environmental benefits

We then move onto the environmental benefits of the modular construction sector. First of all, the question of sustainability is one the massive global construction sector is increasingly being asked to answer:

  • Are the chosen materials sustainable, eco-friendly and long-lasting?
  • Can the pre-fab factories use sustainable energy sources?
  • Are the pre-fab factories sustainable and energy efficient?
  • Can they construct increasingly eco-friendly modular homes off-site?    

These are just a few details that require a positive answer from those modular construction companies who are beginning to gain support, momentum and business across India.

Modulex Modular Buildings PLC is one modular construction firm that can answer in the affirmative to the above questions and many more. It’s the world’s largest and India’s first, steel modular building factory.

Like all Red Ribbon investment projects, Modulex was created with three essential pillars of sustainability in mind:  Planet, People and Profit.

At a time when we need to find more economical ways of providing everything the huge population of India needs, in a way that protects their environment, while also delivering on profit to the investors who support those businesses, Modulex delivers on all three and is well-placed to do so for many years to come.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

India’s Modular Construction market is expected to be worth close to $130 billion by 2023 and at Red Ribbon we think its imperative that as much of the growing industry as possible, is created with sustainability in mind, from the outset.

Providing the answers to India’s housing and construction needs is one thing, but doing it in a way that future generations can benefit from it on multiple levels, is something every investor in the industry should aspire to. That’s why we support Modulex and strive to ensure its green credentials can match its productivity and investor returns.

Eco Hospitality benefits India economy - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

How Eco Hospitality provides a double benefit for India’s economy

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How Eco Hospitality provides a double benefit for India’s economy

The World Bank’s January 2019 Global Prospects Report shows that the United Nations institution continues to expect economic growth across India to expand in 2019 and beyond. The group’s estimate for full-year GDP growth in 2018 is for 7.3%. Meanwhile, the World Bank is also anticipating that level to rise to full-year GDP growth of 7.5% in 2019, 2020 and 2021.

There are many details that go into a forecast like this, which means it is an absolutely achievable and likely outcome. However, if some of the assumptions made in those forecasts don’t proceed as expected. Or, something completely unexpected occurs, then India’s economy could either exceed or fail to achieve that forecast rate of growth.

Another interesting figure that has recently been published about India’s economy, comes from the Indian Government’s Ministry of Statistics. According to its 2018 Environmental statistics, the natural capital in 11 of India’s states has declined. Natural Capital “refers to all types of environmental assets existing in the environment” according to the report.

Once again, a lot of work and details go into creating these data and stats to produce reliable and correct information.
The figures in that painstakingly generated report suggest that, at least in some parts of India, pure economic growth is being achieved at the expense of the country’s natural capital, or native environment. And that’s not something that can be allowed to continue unchecked. At least not if the economy is to remain on a long-term and sustainable, positive economic growth path.

 

Sustainable, eco-industry

With that in mind, we now turn to a specific part of India’s growing economy, the Eco, or green sector. While much thought is being put into how to ensure residential building and consumer habits are increasingly sustainable and Eco-friendly, another key area in which India is already developing an Eco-footprint in, is hospitality.

For a country that welcomed over 10 million overseas tourists during 2017 – an increase of 14% in number and 15.4% in income generation – it’s a sizable industry. In GDP terms, the total contribution from travel and tourism across India made up 9.4% of India’s GDP in 2017, likely rising to around 17% in 2018, according to the World Travel and Tourism Council.

If, however, efforts into supporting and growing the eco-hospitality sector of the travel and tourism industry continue, or even gain pace, not only will green hotels, eco holiday destinations and sustainable tourist hot spots generate welcome income for the economy, it will also help improve and even expand the country’s natural capital. That’s something that’s a double boon for the sub-continent that consistently strives to develop, advance and improve.

Eco Hotels is among the green businesses that are investing in India’s economy, in a sustainable way. The world’s first carbon neutral, mid-market hotel brand has been operating since 2012 and is a popular option, for businesses, investors and also among those travellers who include Eco credentials in their search for holiday accommodation.

Growing India’s eco-hospitality sector is something that is will undoubtedly help ensure the country’s travel and tourism industry will contribute to both the financial GDP figures and its nature capital. But, even better, positive eco changes in one country actually contribute to green credentials and work towards stopping climate change on a global basis too.

With so many benefits to be gained from Eco hospitality, there’s little doubt as to just how valuable it is to India’s economic, business and green ambitions.

Red Ribbon is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral hotel brand which offers “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India designed to take advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand meets all key sustainability criteria without compromising on either quality or standards of hospitality and is designed to cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Understanding the full implications of the way in which a country achieves economic expansion is an essential part of working towards maximising that country’s growth potential, while also making sure all the ingredients required to continue growing and innovating remain available. While the 11 states experiencing a decline in their nature capital account for fewer than half of India’s regions, its not something that should be ignored.

With Eco Hotels, Red Ribbon is putting both India’s economy and nature capital at the heart of its investment strategy. Combatting climate change, promoting sustainable industry and creating profitable carbon neutral businesses, is the right way to create an investment that will remain popular and relevant for years to come.

Modular Construction Housing Needs - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

Modular Construction: The Answer to Housing Needs

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Modular construction is the answer to housing needs

Modular construction is an option for building homes that’s been available for over a century. Its popularity has ebbed and flowed with various significant events and global developments. However, one thing that remains clear about the system of preparing a property in a factory and then constructing that same building on site, in a matter of a few days or even just hours, is that it’s one that builders and policy makers return to whenever a new crisis or real need for homes arises.

Modular homes quickly gained in popularity in the US when they were developed and then sold by Sears at the end of the 19th century. That was fuelled by increasing wealth and an abundance of land to live and build on. The Great depression which began in 1929 soon put paid to the growth of buy and build your own home. And by 1932, Sears’ modular construction home sales were down by 40%. That was enough for them to put an end to that particular part of the business.

World War II ends

However, it wasn’t so very long from then, until the end of World War II in 1945 when soldiers and Governments could fully take in the sheer size of decimation across the UK and Europe, following years of fighting, destruction and bombing.
Add to that the returning soldiers needing homes to live in with their families and it was clear new homes needed to be built. Quickly. Pre-fabrication proved popular once again, with several areas in the UK benefitting from this fast and economical construction method.
However, once things began to settle, the workforce was back in balance and skilled builders were willing and able to work and modular construction, fell out of favour once more.

Confluence of developments

Fast forward to 2019 and there are a broad array of developments that have combined to once again push modular construction to the forefront of residential home building, but this time on a global scale:

  • The UK’s housing crisis where a lack of building during the credit crisis means there aren’t enough homes for the still growing population – the Government is supporting modular construction options to quickly build suitable housing for Britons across the country.
  • Geo-political unrest and refugees moving from place-to-place with nowhere to live – the RICS recently awarded a young home designer its top prize for his low-cost bamboo home that takes just 4 hours to build, to help with the slum crisis in the Philippines.
  • Economic prosperity and demand for homes and commercial properties in rural and city regions – India’s economy is among the fastest growing in the world and the changing needs of the country for less rural workers, to more city-based jobs, means more urban homes are required, quickly.
  • More and more people have developed an eco-conscience, either through their own nature or the growing number of ecological changes and concerns the global population is faced with – home-buyers and developers around the word are actively seeking green homes that are built with sustainable materials and are also powered that way, too.

Together, these separate crises and changes have led to greater demand for modular homes from a wide variety of consumers and policy makers. Meanwhile, that demand combined with a larger business desire to consider sustainability and green options, has encouraged further investment in the sector, too.

Modulex Construction is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, setting out to meet the challenges posed by India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and dynamic manner. The company is at the heart of a project established by Red Ribbon to harness the potential of India’s markets and delivering opportunities for investors. Because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows India and its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

When we think about how modular construction has time and time again proved the right answer to a crisis, problem or change, it becomes a much simpler decision as to whether or not it’s the right investment choice. Add to that the fast-growing knowledge about the importance of eco options and sustainability and modular construction becomes an even more compelling proposition.

Modular construction is already part of India – and the world’s – property development needs. And that’s something that is only going to increase as it becomes a major element of the construction landscape. Not only due to its speed of delivering the finished, habitable product, but also its cost-effectiveness, green credentials and sustainable factors it brings.  That’s why Red Ribbon was committed to Modulex Construction from the very beginning of the project and we remain committed to it today. I’m convinced it is not only a vital element in meeting market challenges but will also deliver on the unprecedented opportunities currently presented by the subcontinent’s burgeoning economy.

Modulex is the answer to many of India’s immediate needs and beyond. By creating sustainable, cost-effective homes and buildings across the country, Modulex is part of a growing industry that will remain relevant and profitable for many, years to come.

Key Benefits Modular Construction - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

Key Benefits of Modular Construction

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Right now, the demand and requirement for residential and commercial property across India remains elevated. And, true to form, the relevant industries are supporting that need in the best way they can – constructing buildings. However, having relied upon mainly traditional methods for so long, that’s the go to option in many cases.

Enter modern, modular construction.

Modular construction techniques have come a long way since the first attempts in the 1800s. Indeed, they’ve even evolved and improved vastly in the past 10 years. That’s part of what makes it a big part of the answer to India’s requirement for homes and business premises. Add to that the easier property construction regulation under forward thinking Prime Minister Modi’s RERA act and modular construction is most definitely an option drawing increased interest. Not only across India, but globally, too.

There are many reasons why that should be the case and is now becoming so.

Why modular construction is an essential part of the solution to India’s housing needs

Because modular construction is an excellent way to create housing and commercial properties of all shapes and sizes, quickly and relatively affordably. This has helped encourage thought and investment into the industry, with extremely positive results.

That’s not to say it should completely take over traditional property construction methods. There’s absolutely room for all kinds of skills and ways of building. However, modular construction is no longer a final thought or last option. It’s right up front with all the other property construction methods, which is exactly where it should be.

Its cost-effective

When it comes to building property, its not something that could ever realistically be described as ‘cheap’. One thing that makes modular construction a more cost-effective building option is the use of set, factory-based methods.

This is particularly relevant for apartment blocks, or developments where properties will feature the same internal layout. Having a set pattern for the off-site, factory construction, means fewer plans, designs and templates are required. This also helps support a more efficient work-rate. In addition, among the various ‘major costs’ of on-site construction, is the wages of builders, supervisors and other professionals, who need to be there. With modular construction, many of the builders only need to be on the actual building site for between a quarter and half of the time they would on traditional build.

Eco-credentials

Building property will always have pros and cons. Among the cons is the amount of waste and also the often-difficult task of ensuring all required energy efficiencies are made-to-measure and in place from the beginning. Utilising a purpose-built modular factory dramatically improves waste control. That’s borne of working to specific measurements in an environment that makes it easy to order only exactly what you need.

That’s not to say that traditional building methods aren’t precise and materials ordered accordingly. But, without such controlled conditions, over-ordering and materials waste is notably higher. But that’s not the only green credential modular construction techniques lay claim to.

By constructing all the internal wall panels and other elements of a modular building in a factory, it’s much simpler to ensure all the required energy efficiencies are fully installed, at source in the right way. This makes any eco-friendly options easier to safely install in the factory. Solar panels, water saving features and suitable heat conservation, or air circulation requirements can be handled in a controlled, measurable way, using the right materials and methods.

Modulex Construction is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, setting out to meet the challenges posed by India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and dynamic manner. The company is at the heart of a project established by Red Ribbon to harness the potential of India’s markets and delivering opportunities for investors. Because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows India and its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

India’s housing needs are no secret. But nor are the advances in techniques to help support faster and more cost-effective construction options. Add to that a supportive Government regulatory environment it begins to make sense that all types of reliable and suitable methods are put to good use. We, along with an increasing number of professionals, investors and industry specialists, know that modular construction is a major part of the answer to India’s housing needs.

Modular construction is already part of India – and the world’s – property development needs. And that’s something that is only going to increase as it becomes a major element of the construction landscape. Not only due to its speed of delivering the finished, habitable product, but also its cost-effectiveness, green credentials and sustainable factors it brings.  That’s why Red Ribbon was committed to Modulex Construction from the very beginning of the project and we remain committed to it today. I’m convinced it is not only a vital element in meeting market challenges but will also deliver on the unprecedented opportunities currently presented by the subcontinent’s burgeoning economy.

The Eco Hotel Phenomenon and Donald Trump’s observations- Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

The Eco Hotel Phenomenon and Donald Trump’s observations

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What turns a run of the mill, resource hungry hotel into an Eco Hotel and why does it matter? Well, the clue lies partly in the question: an Eco Hotel isn’t resource hungry at all. Instead of gobbling away at all before it, an Eco Hotel sips and nibbles at its key resources: energy, water and raw materials. Eco Hotels are hard wired to save water and minimise on energy and waste material usage. But what about the second part of the question: why does any of this matter? Look no further than last week’s US National Climate Change Assessment, the work of 300 scientists and 13 Federal Agencies which concluded that “ Earth’s climate is now changing faster than at any point in the history of modern civilisation, primarily as a result of human activities…” Donald Trump may have dismissed the three-inch thick report out of hand as “largely based on the most extreme scenario”, but virtually nobody else is.

And for a President so intent on wrapping himself in a mantle of economic competence (and hotel owner to boot), the supreme irony is that key policies at the heart of a concerted response to adverse climate change are now proving to be drivers of commercial growth too. Eco Hotels are a case in point.

By definition, a non resource hungry hotel will also have reduced operating costs: it’s also likely to have reduced liabilities, will generally produce a higher return on relatively low risk investments and also deliver greater profitability across the board than its more resource hungry counterparts. Those are the hard conclusions arrived at in the seminal sector report for the subcontinent “Green Hotels and Sustainable Hotel Operations in India” and, perhaps inevitably, the markets haven’t been slow to see their potential either. Green hotels are more popular than ever on the subcontinent and if you need solid evidence of that, look no further than the explosive growth of Lemon Tree Hotels after the company’s successful IPO earlier this year.

Donald Trump could usefully brush up on his bedtime reading before leaving the West Wing to resume control of his own hotel chain …

The travelling public (business and leisure) is now increasingly aware of the importance of environmental compliance when it comes to choosing a hotel room, and the current surge in demand on the subcontinent is running well ahead of supply: not least because India’s tourist numbers have reached unprecedented levels in absolute terms as well.

But when it comes to meeting this burgeoning demand in practice, something much more is required than simply re-branding an existing hotel with “green credentials”. Key consumption variables have to be built in from the very beginning of the construction phase: making water saving devices and waste reduction part of the DNA of the hotel from the outset of the project. That’s why Eco Hotels are being built with solar tubing that reflects light across the hotel day and night, resulting in electricity bills that are roughly half those of a conventional hotel and its properties also has a single kitchen which dramatically reduces the carbon footprint. All those savings go straight to the bottom line.

Red Ribbon is the founder of Eco Hotels, the world’s first carbon neutral hotel brand which offers “green hospitality” as part of a progressive roll out across India designed to take advantage of current market opportunities on the subcontinent. The brand meets all key sustainability criteria without compromising on either quality or standards of hospitality and is designed to cater for commercial and recreational travellers alike.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

The boom in Indian tourism (both domestically and internationally) is currently playing a huge part in driving forward the subcontinent’s resurgent hotel and hospitality sector, and as the article says eco credentials are playing a bigger part than ever in determining where this burgeoning tide of travellers are deciding to stay. Recent surveys confirm so called “green credentials” are high up on the scale of priorities when they come to make their choice.

And as the article also says, meeting that demand is certainly not just a matter of a last minute rebranding. To deliver properly on green credentials, the hotel has to be built with eco compliance as part of its structure (from the ground up). Only by doing this will cost savings and sustainability criteria properly come together in the future operation of the hotel, delivering the range of benefits described in the article.

I’m proud that Eco Hotels have done just that from the very beginning of the project, and proud too of the part Red Ribbon has played in developing the brand and its ambitions in the succeeding years, spearheading an environmentally friendly response to India’ resurgent tourism demands.

India Real Estate - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

Time matters with India’s Real Estate revitalisation

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KPMG reported last month that Indian Real Estate Sector has now entered a “revitalisation mode”, with aggregate growth projected to reach $ 650 Billion by 2025 and topping $850 Billion by 2028: the average yearly contribution of real estate to the Indian economy will more than double from its current 7% by 2025. And CBRE India are equally optimistic: in their own quarterly report, snappily titled “India Real Estate: Variance in Construction Costs”, they forecast 17 Million new jobs will be added to the sector and an additional 8.2 Billion square feet of space released by 2025.  It all resonates well with the ambitions objectives of Prime Minister Modi’s Affordable Housing Programme, with Real Estate now set firmly in growth mode, and growing stronger every year. But there’s a dark shadow in the garden…

Each of these influential reports has highlighted a potential issue relating to construction costs on the subcontinent, capable of acting as a brake on growth and with no less than six major conurbations (Chennai, Pune, Hyderabad, Mumbai and Delhi) causing particular concern. Perhaps predictably, Mumbai tops the list of areas where unit construction costs have spiralled over recent years and show little sign of slowing down despite the broadly stabilizing effect of GST legislation introduced by the Modi Administration which helped smooth out some of the worst supply and pricing differentials across the country.

The average cost of construction for a residential apartment in Mumbai is now Rs 3,125 per square foot, compared to the Rs 2,375 per square foot the same apartment will cost in Hyderabad. At one (macro) level the reason for all this is obvious: an increasingly urbanised population pushing up demand for units in the largest conurbations as part of a gradual drift away from the land, but the disparity in relative costs between conurbations is still striking. Inter market differentials of this kind are likely to be caused primarily to an uneven distribution of construction skills, with highly skilled workers drawn to areas of greater demand so increasing the unit cost of labour in specific areas of the subcontinent. Certainly we might expect other variables such as recent sharp rises in the wholesale price of steel to be more uniformly spread across the country.

In short, construction is becoming progressively more expensive in the very areas where more housing and commercial units are likely to be needed most…and that’s a real dilemma.

One answer is to make greater use of just in time delivery systems which are capable of dramatically reducing overall construction schedules: simple maths tells us that if an expensive worker is on site for a quarter of the normal building phase, costs will come down no matter how prohibitive the daily rate. And of course we have now grown used to the significance of just in time methodologies because of the prominence the issue has assumed as part of the current Brexit debate. Just as any significant inhibition on frictionless trade has potential to throw the UK economy into chaos after Brexit, so too the same frictionless technologies can help address systemic cost differentials across the Indian construction sector as well.

Modular Construction prefabricates all of the essential components of the building off site, everything from exterior walls, ventilation systems and internal wiring networks with the parts then arriving on location only when they’re needed: meaning field workers aren’t left waiting around (expensively) for the next phase of the project to get underway. Research has shown that through a combination of just in time delivery techniques and modular technology, otherwise complex units such as student accommodation blocks or hospitals can be erected on site in days rather than the months and sometimes years of conventional technologies. And an added advantage is that Modular Technology also reduces the potential for human error and snagging in the final building which can also be a major but hidden expense on any project.

Modulex Construction is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, setting out to meet the challenges posed by India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and dynamic manner. The company is at the heart of a project established by Red Ribbon to harness the potential of India’s markets and delivering opportunities for investors. Because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows India and its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Prime Minister Modi has successfully appealed to the youthful and increasingly urbanised population that is currently driving India’s economic growth, not least through his Government’s re-energised Affordable Housing Programme the scale and scope of which has at times been breathtaking. So it should come as no surprise to learn that such an increasingly mobile population is also creating real estate hot spots (and cost differentials) through being attracted to a number of specific locations: by definition, a mobile population is difficult to keep still.

So as it seems to me the resulting cost differentials in construction across the subcontinent are likely to be a fact of life for some years to come yet. But that’s certainly not to diminish the problem, and cost disparities are a problem in India’s most expensive real estate markets, Mumbai in particular. They have real potential to distort the market.

In delivering a workable solution to that challenge most expert commentators now agree that Modular Construction is simply inescapable. No other technology offers the pace and scale of delivery needed to meet India’s housing needs and, as the article points out, it is the perfect corollary for just in time delivery systems. That’s why Red Ribbon was committed to Modulex Construction from the very beginning of the project and we remain committed to it today. I’m convinced it is not only a vital element in meeting market challenges but will also deliver on the unprecedented opportunities currently presented by the subcontinent’s burgeoning economy.

Modular Construction India - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

Modular Construction: the answer to the shortage of skills in India

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Most Indians work in agriculture but next comes construction, and according to the latest Economic Survey the subcontinent’s real estate and construction sector is likely to create more than 15 Million jobs over the next five years, that’s three million every year. To put that in perspective less than 3 Million people are currently employed in the entire UK construction industry. And of the 52 Million building workers employed by Indian companies, 90% are involved in on-site construction with the other 10% busily painting, plumbing and wiring the finished product. It’s fair to say all these painters, plumbers and electricians are skilled workers…but not so the other 90%.

Because the vast majority of India’s construction workers are either minimally skilled or have no skills at all: an astonishing 97% of them aged between 15 and 65 will receive no formal training of any kind before starting work on site and, plumbers and painters aside, most of the skilled workers won’t be getting any cement dust on their boots because they’re probably office based clerks, technicians and engineers. And that’s a real problem…

It’s a problem, because coming the other way down India’s infrastructure and logistics superhighway is an unprecedented surge in demand for urban housing, fuelled by an increasingly urbanised population projected to become the biggest on the planet by 2022. India’s National Skill Development Council predicts that by then the real estate and construction sector will require a workforce of more than 66 Million, so without any obvious core of skilled workers currently able to sustain anything like growth it’s no wonder the sector is starting to show signs of stress.

Of course all this was supposed to be addressed by 2016’s Real Estate (Regulation and Development) Act which was intended to act as a platform for local, State driven planning capable of creating an appropriate environment for improved training and regulatory structures, but so far six States out of 29 have failed to produce any plans at all under the legislation which means finding workers with the right skills in the right place will continue to be a source of real concern.

Billionaire developer Niranjan Hiranandani, head of Hiranandani Construction, has a simple enough solution: just pay unskilled workers less and reap the savings while you can. But that’s not a particularly attractive solution for anyone buying one of his apartments 76 floors up in the Mumbai skyline where quality assurance is far from being a dispensable extra. The behemoth that is Hindustan Construction Company perhaps takes a slightly more realistic approach, going on record last week to say that skills shortages have become a huge problem for the sector: 50% of its workforce needs advanced training just to use the complex machinery now prevalent on most modern building sites. With a heavy tone of understatement a spokesman for the company announced grandly that given these skilled workers are not available, “the only option is to train them”.

Well, it’s not quite the only option…

With no actual shortage of workers seeking employment in India’s urban conurbations, particularly in the light of a seemingly inexorable drift of former agricultural workers from country to town, what if the physical construction process itself could be de-skilled? Why not make a virtue of necessity and draw on this pool of former agricultural labourers to release the margins of between 20% to 70% that Deloitte India predict would follow from a wholesale deskilling initiative? These savings would go straight to the bottom line without endangering the quality and safety of the finished building. Skilled construction workers earn Rs 1,000 a day as opposed to their unskilled counterparts who earn an average of Rs 200.

And there is just such a business model on the market right now, a model with the potential to uncouple construction projects from a seemingly insoluble skills conundrum: it’s called Modular Construction.

Modern Modular technologies allow all of the building’s key components to be put together off site by specialist workers and then assembled locally at the same time as the site works are completed, not only reducing overall completion schedules by as much as 50% but also significantly reducing the need for skilled workers in the construction phase. All of the design and engineering disciplines are instead concentrated at the offsite manufacturing facility leading to labour, financing and supervision costs. Which will all be music to Mr Hiranandani’s ears…

Modulex Construction is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Construction Company, meeting the challenges of the subcontinent’s current urban housing shortages in a practical and focused manner. The company was founded by Red Ribbon as part of an innovative project to harness the potential of India’s dynamic and evolving real estate markets whilst at the same time delivering opportunities for investors through Red Ribbon platform. Because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows India’s markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Delivering on India’s stringent housing targets over the next five years presents an enormous challenge for the subcontinent, and that challenge is likely to get more testing still given the underlying demographics of a rapidly increasing and ever more urbanised population. Existing skills shortages within the construction sector have the potential to be a crucial block to meeting these targets, especially given the scale and scope of the training programmes necessary to release a further 3 Million workers into the sector every year for the next five years: never mind the attendant costs which are likely to be eye watering on any basis.

That’s why to my mind the answer has to be Modular Construction. No conventional technologies can beat it for sheer pace of delivery and, with a centralising of skilled labour in the offsite manufacturing facility, it will beat conventional construction methods hands down on overall profitability too.

Indian Real Estate, Modulex Modular Buildings, Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

Affordable Housing for India: A Perfect Storm of Opportunity

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Affordable Housing for India: A Perfect Storm of Opportunity

Mumbai’s skyline has, of course, been transformed beyond recognition over recent years, but its glass pinnacles are well beyond the reach of all but its wealthiest residents. So you need to look closer to the earth to find the true driver behind the subcontinent’s resurgent real estate sector.

India’s increasingly youthful population is moving out of the countryside at an increasing rate in search of better work, pay and living conditions and this is precisely the demographic the Affordable Housing Policy is designed to appeal to, because the dream of having a home (or a flat) of one’s own resonates like nothing else with this new wave of discriminating voters on the subcontinent…and nobody knows that better than Narendra Modi. His Government has aggressively pursued legacy policies on housing with the introduction of a raft of new tax incentives over the course of the last two Union Budgets, including giving infrastructure status to qualifying affordable housing, offering developers increased tax concessions and providing buyers with a range of fiscal incentives including subsidised interest payments.

And it’s not just voters who are being energised: investors are responding positively too in increasingly ingenious ways. For example, because banks in India aren’t allowed to finance land acquisitions the Private Equity Fund KKR has moved into the sector to offer development funding directly to contractors, taking an equity stake in the completed project. In what might be taken by some as a statement of the obvious, Sanjay Nayar of KKR India pointed out that “with the right project and partners, there’s good money to be made”.

There is indeed Mr Nayar.

Chris Wood of Citic Securities perhaps put it a little more eloquently: “Affordable housing in India remains one of the most straightforward bull stories in Asian equities. There will be an acceleration in economic activity in India in the coming 18 months driven by housing.”

But there is, of course, at least one (more or less hidden) difficulty with all of that. Given such a voracious and burgeoning consumer appetite coupled with capital market ambition and expansionist government policies, where are all these new homes going to come from? As we have noted previously on this site, stoking up such high levels of demand means India is now committed to building 856 new homes every hour between until 2050. Traditional construction technologies simply aren’t up to that kind of challenge, which is why commentators (including KPMG India’s Director of Real Estate Neeraj Bansal) have pinpointed Modular Construction as the single most important innovator in the sector.

By prefabricating units at scale and off site, Modular Construction is capable of delivering affordable housing on the required scale and at a reasonable cost: three times quicker and half as expensive as traditional construction methods. It is perfectly positioned to meet the demands and opportunities being created by this perfect storm in India’s real estate markets.

As Mr Nayer would probably say over at KKR: “there’s good money to be made”.

Modulex Construction is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, working to meet the Challenge of India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and focused manner. It was established by Red Ribbon to harness the potential of India’s dynamic and fast evolving markets, delivering exciting opportunities for investors. Because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows India and its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Modulex Modular Buildings Plc is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, working to meet the Challenge of India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and focussed manner. It was established by Red Ribbon to harness the full potential of India’s dynamic and fast evolving markets, delivering exciting opportunities for investors because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

For me, the key determinant of exponential growth in India’s real estate sector over recent years is the combination of an unprecedented growth in the subcontinent’s population and a rapid trend for its urbanisation: largely, as the article rightly points out, a product of this rapidly expanding population becoming progressively more youthful and more affluent. In time honoured fashion, India’s younger demographic is streaming from village to city with money in its pocket (in the hope of making more).

This is the demographic that Prime Minister Modi has so successfully appealed to through his Government’s re-energised Affordable Housing Programme: the other key factor driving growth in the sector. As with some of his other radical initiatives, the scale and scope of the programme has at times been breathtaking, but in truth it has to be to meet the sheer scale of the challenge.

And when it comes to delivering a workable solution to that challenge it seems to me, as most expert commentators now recognise, that the attraction of Modular Construction is simply inescapable. No other technology offers the pace and scale of delivery needed to meet India’s housing needs. That’s why Red Ribbon was committed to Modulex Construction from the very beginning of the project and we remain committed to it today. I’m convinced it is a vital element in meeting the challenges as well as making the most of the opportunities currently being presented by the subcontinent’s markets.

But none of that should beguile us from forgetting the sheer scale of the housing challenge India currently faces, in common with other leading global economies. Traditional construction technology simply can’t deliver to the scale and pace required by projected demand on existing governmental programmes. No wonder then than Modular Construction is a policy priority for Prime Minister Modi’s Government. It’s only a question of time before others follow suit…

Indian Real Estate and Modular Construction - Red Ribbon Asset Management Plc

A Sense of Understatement: Modular Construction and Indian Real Estate

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A Sense of Understatement: Modular Construction and Indian Real Estate

Mitsubishi Corporation announced this month its first ever investment in Indian Housing: it will invest $25 Million in Chennai through its subsidiary DRI India and plans to build 1,450 new homes on a 186,000 square meter site. And as if you needed any reminding of the buoyancy of Indian real estate, three quarters of those units have already been sold. Mitsubishi expects to earn more than 10 Billion rupees on the project within four years so it was probably with a sense of understatement that a Mitsubishi spokesman told the press last week that: “…middle-income earners (in India) are expected to expand, boosting housing demand.”

No prizes for original thinking there.

The United Nations has repeatedly forecast that the subcontinent’s current population of 1.3 Billion will overtake China by 2022, making it the most populous in the world so yes, middle-income earners on the subcontinent are indeed “expected to expand”…and how. Added to which India is already the fastest growing large economy on the planet, with an increasingly urbanised population so the demand for new homes will indeed be “boosted”. Look no further than the burgeoning conurbations of Mumbai and Bangalore. Mitsubishi might not be winning any prizes for economic analysis anytime soon but its decision to invest in the subcontinent’s real estate sector makes perfect business sense.

Of course, in the overall context of the economic phenomenon that is India, 1,450 homes is a drop in the Ocean. Just to keep pace with current housing demands, the subcontinent needs to build 856 new homes every hour (using up Mitsubishi’s contribution in less than two hours).

And that provides a graphic illustration of why Modular Construction is now at the top of the subcontinent’s political agenda.

Modular Construction is literally changing the shape of the world we live in: not just for homes but hospitals, bus stations and offices too…if it can be built at all, it can be built quicker and more efficiently in a modular format. So if, like India, you need to build nearly 900 new homes an hour, it should be obvious where to look for the solution. Indeed, having announced this week that the United Kingdom Government will commit an additional £2 Billion to affordable housing projects, Theresa May could usefully take a leaf out of Prime Minister Modi’s playbook.

And that’s not the half of it…with recent concerns over air quality in India’s conurbations also making the news recently, modular construction technologies also provide a ready answer to environmental concerns. Its technology eliminates high moisture levels occurring in traditional building materials, with units being constructed off site and indoors well away from adverse weather conditions. That not only protects the integrity of the structure but prevents excess moisture building up in the wooden framing too.

Modulex Modular Buildings Plc is the World’s largest and India’s first Steel Modular Building Company, working to meet the Challenge of India’s urban housing shortages in a practical and focussed manner. It was established by Red Ribbon to harness the full potential of India’s dynamic and fast evolving markets, delivering exciting opportunities for investors because, when it comes to investing on the subcontinent, nobody knows its markets better than Red Ribbon.

Red Ribbon CEO, Suchit Punnose said:

Mitsubishi’s entry into the Indian Real Estate sector should come as no surprise to anyone: major Japanese consortia have been leading the wave of inward investment into the subcontinent in the wake of key initiatives such as Delhi’s high speed rail system. But the article is right to characterise Mitsubishi’s commentary on the strength of the sector as a wild understatement. India is currently the fastest growing large economy in the World, with a burgeoning and increasingly urbanised population that is projected to be the largest on the planet by 2022. That will inevitably make the subcontinent’s real estate market an attractive proposition for any investor.

But none of that should beguile us from forgetting the sheer scale of the housing challenge India currently faces, in common with other leading global economies. Traditional construction technology simply can’t deliver to the scale and pace required by projected demand on existing governmental programmes. No wonder then than Modular Construction is a policy priority for Prime Minister Modi’s Government. It’s only a question of time before others follow suit…

Red Ribbon

At Red Ribbon we understand that the transition towards a resilient global economy will be led by well-governed businesses in mainstream markets, striving to reduce the environmental impact of their production processes on society at large and on the environment as well.

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